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A Sample Morning Routine for People With Type 2 Diabetes

Last updated: February 2023

Living with type 2 diabetes can feel like a full-time job. While you may not be able to change your diagnosis, you can create a positive morning routine to set your day up for success, help you manage symptoms, and maintain an overall healthy lifestyle. Here are some tips I've tried for creating a steady morning routine that helps me manage my diabetes.

Check your blood sugar in the morning

The most important aspect of your morning routine is to check your blood sugar levels. Knowing your current blood sugar level will help you determine if you need to adjust your medicines or nutrition. Checking your blood sugar levels will provide you with information regarding any dangerous spikes or lows in blood sugar so that you can address them quickly and effectively.

Learn what impacts your diabetes

Taking control of your well-being begins with understanding your body and what functions best for you. An essential part of self-care is knowing how food, activity, stress, and sleep can impact your diabetes.

So, don't wait for something terrible to happen — instead, be proactive and monitor your blood sugar levels each morning to be ready before anything happens.

Enjoy a balanced breakfast

Beginning your day with a balanced and nutritious breakfast is essential for managing type 2 diabetes. A nourishing breakfast plays a vital role in stabilizing blood sugar levels throughout the day, plus it helps boost your energy levels so that you can tackle whatever the day throws at you.

A breakfast meal with a balance of complex carbohydrates, proteins, fats, and fiber will provide the fuel your body needs to remain active and focused, so make sure to plan ahead!

Be mindful of portion size

Keep an eye on portion sizes, too. Find your optimal amount of breakfast. Sometimes eating too much can cause your blood sugar levels to increase, while not eating enough can cause them to drop too low. When it comes to controlling your diabetes, start by making sure breakfast is covered!

Morning-time movement

Physical activity is the key to a better quality of life and more steady blood sugar when it comes to managing type 2 diabetes symptoms. Exercise doesn't have to be intense for it to be beneficial. There's no need to overdo it; even 15-20 minutes of movement each morning, like walking the dog, can significantly improve insulin sensitivity, aid with weight management, and boost your mood!

You don't have to break the bank by buying expensive gym membership or equipment; you only need the motivation and determination to get up and move! Don't let the freshness of the morning pass without reaping the many health benefits of movement.

A morning routine sets you up for success

Creating a morning routine specifically tailored to your type 2 diabetes needs can help make managing it easier and more stress-free. Check your blood sugar levels first thing in the morning, eat a balanced breakfast with appropriate portion sizes, and find time for at least 20 minutes of activity throughout the day.

These steps will go a long way toward keeping symptoms at bay. With practice and consistency, you'll soon find that managing type 2 diabetes doesn't have to take over your life!

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This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Type2Diabetes.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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