A woman lies on her yoga mat on the floor of her living room in a gentle stretch.

Making Mindful Moves With Diabetes and a Disability

Last updated: November 2022

When I was diagnosed with diabetes, it was a real wake-up call. I had always been relatively health-conscious, but suddenly I had to be much more mindful of everything. From what I ate to how I handled stress, so many factors would affect my blood glucose levels. It was a lot to get used to, especially since I had just become disabled that same year.

Community and advocacy are important

I found that being more mindful of my health as a person with diabetes and a disability made me a better advocate for myself. I learned how to speak up for myself when doctors didn't understand my needs, and I became more active in the type 2 diabetes community.

In some ways, having diabetes has been a blessing in disguise. It's made me more aware of the unique challenges faced by my disability and more determined to take better care of myself overall. In this article, I am sharing the lessons I have learned so far.

Lesson 1: the mindful moves I make with my body

As a person with type 2 diabetes, I have to be extra mindful of how I move my body to stay safe and healthy. That's why I like to do things like yoga and walking. Yoga is a great way to stay active without putting too much strain on my body.

Walking is also a good low-impact activity that helps me get some fresh air and blood pumping. And both of these activities help me to manage my diabetes by keeping my blood sugar levels in check. So if you're looking for safe ways to stay active as a person with type 2 diabetes, then I highly recommend yoga and walking.

Of course, it's always important to consult your doctor before starting any new exercise program. But if you're looking for 2 safe and effective activities to help you manage your diabetes, yoga and walking are definitely worth considering.

Lesson 2: the mindful moves I make with my thoughts

As a person with a disability, I must be extra mindful of my stress levels. That's because my blood sugar levels go up when I'm in pain or extreme distress. So, I've developed some strategies for managing stress in a healthy way.

Journaling is really helpful. It allows me to process my thoughts and emotions and get them out of my head.

Meditation has also been beneficial. It helps me to focus and be present in the moment. And spending time with breathing exercises and reading has also helped reduce my stress levels. By being more mindful of my stress, I can manage my diabetes better.

Lesson 3: the mindful moves I make in my home

I have found that being more mindful of my surroundings and creating a sanctuary in my home has been essential for my overall well-being. Using essential oils, like lavender and citrus, helps to boost my morale and mood. Keeping an organized home also helps me to manage my stress levels. Creating a space conducive to my health and happiness is important to me, and I am grateful that I can do so.

Living mindfully with diabetes

There are many mindful moves we can make as people with type 2 diabetes, and I've shared some of the habits that work best for me.

What moves will you add to your routine? How will you ensure that self-care is front and center in your journey? The most important thing is to start somewhere and then keep moving forward.

Let us know how you go by sharing your story with us on social media or in the comments below. We're all in this together!

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This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Type2Diabetes.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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