They Said What?! Dealing with Irritating Comments About T2D

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With type 2 diabetes, there’s so much to think about. Monitoring blood sugar. Managing treatments and doctor’s appointments. Scrutinizing every carb and menu option. It can be exhausting.

One thing that doesn’t help? All. Those. Comments. You know what we mean. The unwanted comments ranging from insensitive to “helpful” advice.

At times, it can seem like everyone has something to say about your condition. We asked our Type2Diabetes.com community about some of the most irritating comments they’ve received from family, friends, coworkers – even doctors. And they had a lot to share.

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you're not a real diabetic. You brought this on yourself. - type2diabetes.com Community Member

Community Poll

Do you ever feel like you have to defend your food choices?

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The food police

Living with T2D, you likely know your dietary needs. In fact, some people may be acutely aware of every morsel’s composition. Long before reaching for a slice of cake, you may have weighed the consequences of eating it.

Then along comes the food police — a.k.a. family and friends. “You can’t have that” is often heard by our community members. A pleasant social occasion can suddenly feel like a trial, where you have to defend your meal choices. It can be a challenging relationship to navigate. You want their help – without the overreaching. Knowing how to ask for the right balance of support is key.

And what about doctors? It can be especially frustrating when your doctor commits this kind of infraction. Learning how to self-advocate can help make conversations easier with your entire healthcare team.

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a cake with a flashing light on top

“Someone grabbed my arm as I was about to take a bite of cake at a baby shower and said, ‘You can’t eat that.’ That was embarrassing and none of their business.”

– Type2Diabetes.com Community Member


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But you don’t look like a diabetic

We know, we know. We’re collectively facepalming right now, too.

So, what exactly does a person with type 2 diabetes look like anyway? The myth still persists that someone living with type 2 diabetes is overweight. Or self-indulgent. Or [insert stereotype here]. The truth? People of all shapes and sizes live with this condition.

When it comes to T2D, the stigma is real. If comfortable, having an honest dialogue with others can help open new doors on old ways of thinking. And, of course, don’t forget the importance of self-care.

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Community Poll

Who makes the most comments about your T2D?

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“You can't be diabetic – you're not that fat!”

– Type2Diabetes.com Community Member


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To cheat or not to cheat

“Go on, a little bit won’t hurt you.” Uhhh, yes it could.

Managing T2D is an everyday thing, not something you can simply turn off and on. There’s so much to be aware of – from watching what you eat to monitoring your glucose levels to looking out for possible complications down the road.

The reality: a little now can have a major impact later. And many in our community wish that others understood this better. Every meal matters. What to do? Surrounding yourself with the right support – and teaching others how to best help you – can go a long way.

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a donut being eaten

“I told my granddaughter once I couldn’t eat a donut because of the carbs. She told me to live a little.”

– Type2Diabetes.com Community Member


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Own your zone

Those small comments can trigger big feelings. One thing that may help? Remembering that not everyone understands T2D or how much it really affects your day-to-day. By having open conversations, you can start to raise awareness and help lessen the stigma.

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Community Poll

When it comes to T2D, your biggest worry is: