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A doctor's waiting room with a row of chairs and plant. Instead of people sitting in the chairs there are devices with video's of patients on them.

Tips for Your Telemedicine Appointment

Telemedicine is stepping it up a notch in our current world, so that everyone can stay safe and healthy. Doctor’s offices are offering appointments remotely, over the phone and via apps, in order to keep us healthy and germs at bay. And insurance companies are now starting to pay for telehealth services because they realize the value and necessity of telemedicine for so many in the current state of our world.

Tips for telemedicine with diabetes

Here are some tips to make sure you’re properly prepared for your telehealth appointment.

Get lab work done early

Things and tasks take longer these days. Make sure you get your lab work done early. If you usually do it seven days before your doctor’s appointment, get your lab work done at least 10 days before your appointment. Labs are inundated with blood work because of recent events.

Know your portal

Health portals are key. Create your user name/password and explore your healthcare providers' health portal BEFORE YOUR APPOINTMENT.

Get there early

Like an office visit, get to your computer early. Make sure you're charged and/or plugged in, and that your camera and mic are in working order.

Make a list

Write a list of any and all symptoms you might be experiencing, questions you have, and any health topic you need/ want to discuss with your doctor. For example: If you notice your blood glucose levels are trending higher at a certain time of the day, write it down and discuss. Everyone thinks they will remember to discuss a topic with their doctor but if you don’t write it down, there’s a chance you’ll forget!

Take lots of notes

Take notes during the appointment and or record the session with your smartphone, just like you would if you were at an office appointment.

Give feedback

Let your healthcare team know what you thought about your telemedicine appointment. Telemedicine is a learning curve for everyone. Feedback helps your healthcare professionals know what’s working and what isn’t and allows them to make improvements.

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This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Type2Diabetes.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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