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A magnifying glass examining feet

Have You Checked Your Feet?

Lately I’ve been thinking of my diabetes self care, focusing mainly on my feet. I have never given much thought to my feet. They are just feet. Mine are not pretty. They have rough skin on the heels. I wash them everyday. I trim my toenails as I need to but I have never followed the guideline that says always cut them straight across. Once in a while I will paint my toenails and admittedly, they look nice then. Now that I really think about it, my feet are more like man feet than woman feet.

As you can tell, my feet have never meant anything to me before. So why am I focusing on them now? Because I have read a few articles here on type2diabetes.com about foot care and why it’s important. The articles are factual but I never really thought they applied to me. But here’s the part that has changed me, that has changed my routine. I have read the comments from people, real people here, who are experiencing serious complications involving their feet, sometimes amputations. It’s never been more real to me as I read comments on others post. I’m a person with diabetes and it should be real to me. Diabetes carries with it risks for complications.

Foot confessions

Here’s my foot confession. I walk barefoot in the house, on my porch, on the beach. I don’t particularly like shoes or sandals once I’m home from work. They are off at the door for the day never to return unless I need to drive or go for a walk that was missed. Since I committed to ‘taking a look’ at my feet I decided the time was now.

Somewhat nervous, I checked my feet. Immediately, I found two slivers that I didn’t know were there. I removed them. They were surface ones, not deep ones. I couldn’t believe it, I didn’t feel them. Next. Rough, dry cracked heels. I could be an ad on tv for foot cream. Since I don’t really like the feel of cream on my feet in the first place, I had to tough that one out. I put on cream and socks, also not my favorite, to keep the cream in place. They were quite soft the next day and splinter free.

Foot care

Reflecting back to the comments many of you have posted, I have changed the care of my feet:

  • I inspect them daily
  • I apply cream at night to avoid the dry cracked skin that can allow infection to set in
  • I trim my toenails straight across
  • I have asked a friend to give me the name of her podiatrist to further assess my feet and teach me good foot care
  • I will TRY to avoid walking barefoot but I know I will struggle with this, a work in progress I guess

I thank all of you who offered your thoughts, your experiences and advised of what can happen to those of us who think foot care is not important. You have brought me into the light. Hugs!

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Type2Diabetes.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • JoBo
    1 month ago

    Sorry to be so ignorant, but what are silvers? Also, why shouldn’t we go bare foot around the house?

  • Kelly Dabel, RD moderator
    1 month ago

    We appreciate your question JoBo. A sliver is another name for a splinter or tiny piece of wood under the skin. In addition to the dynamic diabetic’s comment and in addition to speaking with your doctor, this article on Foot care and it’s importance may be helpful to you: https://type2diabetes.com/living/foot-health/. Best, Kelly, Type2diabetes.com Community Moderator

  • TheDynamicDiabetic
    1 month ago

    Going barefoot can be dangerous for diabetics. We sometimes lose feeling in areas on our feet and you might not feel something damaging your foot. Like stepping on a tack and not realize it until you see blood. Wounds to your feet may be harder to heal for diabetics, too. So protecting your feet is a smart precaution.

  • Shelley, TheLongPointGirl moderator author
    12 months ago

    Re the cheese grater: people do some things out of desperation or just plain lack of knowledge but I worry about folks who go to those measures. Consequences are very high.

  • TheDynamicDiabetic
    1 month ago

    I find the cheese grater so crazy I cannot imagine someone doing that. There are new products that will allow you to keep your feet in good shape. I use one that is terrific and keeps my feet more like how they feel fete my podiatrist treats them. Not sure I can promote the product here though.

  • Shelley, TheLongPointGirl moderator author
    1 year ago

    Sounds like you have a good podiatrist! Sorry you have to live with the pain and discomfort though. Thinking of you.

  • Thomas A McAtee Jr. moderator
    12 months ago

    Thanks. Yes, she’s very good. Can’t see putting me through pain and loss of use if can avoid it. Plus she’s not too crazy about the odds of coming back in same spot since it’s already weakened and maybe even have a new one start elsewhere. But said would do it if push comes to shove. I like her. She’s always doing best to take care of her patients.

  • Shelley, TheLongPointGirl moderator author
    12 months ago

    She sounds great!

  • Thomas A McAtee Jr. moderator
    1 year ago

    Very good read. And whatever you do, don’t use a cheese grader to trim calluses either. I know, sounds far fetched maybe but I actually know someone who did that and guess what happened. Lost a foot.

  • Shelley, TheLongPointGirl moderator author
    1 year ago

    Thanks! I shiver at the thought of a cheese grater. I can’t imagine.

  • Thomas A McAtee Jr. moderator
    12 months ago

    I couldn’t believe he’d do such a thing either and was surprised when he told me that the actually did.

  • Samuel Taylor moderator
    1 year ago

    Ahhhh thats terrible! I’m sorry to hear that they lost a foot! I would never think to use a cheese grader for that. As a climber I always manage my calluses with a sanding block and it works quite well! -Type2Diabetes.com Team

  • Shelley, TheLongPointGirl moderator author
    1 year ago

    Great idea Samuel. Thanks!

  • Thomas A McAtee Jr. moderator
    1 year ago

    I’ve tried those pumice stones, fingernail files with the sandpaper on the etc. But hurt too much. Both feet have in bad spots and after going through that mess I’ve decided to let my podiatrist take care of them instead.

    Was told could operate and remove. She’d have to do bone work in them and feet would be out of commission for about 6 weeks each doing one at a time. Plus since those places are weakened there would be a pretty good chance of them coming back in same place again or in an area close by.

    I was told that she couldn’t guarantee they would never come back. So, decided to put up with the pain of them instead until it gets to point where would take that kind of a chance. She told me if her she’d hold off until it got to that kind of a point as well. Like her. She takes great care.

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