Diabetes Monitoring and Tracking by the Numbers

Diabetes Monitoring and Tracking by the Numbers

With type 2 diabetes, numbers are crucial. Whether it’s your hemoglobin A1C level or your blood glucose level, testing and tracking of these numbers becomes routine. While it may seem overwhelming, we uncovered a few numbers when surveying Type 2 Diabetes patients that illustrate the necessity and value of tracking and testing.

3 out of 4

Surveyed have their hemoglobin A1C  routinely tested by their healthcare professional, as well as test their blood glucose (blood sugar) on their own on a regular basis (73%). 18% of individuals have their A1C tested but do not test their blood sugar on their own, and 5% only test their blood sugar on their own.
Of those who have their A1C tested, had their most recent test within the previous 3 months (74%). Less than 8% of these individuals went more than 6 months between tests. The primary reason for not having regular A1C testing coincided with not seeing a healthcare professional regularly (41%).

2,072 T2D patients
Completed the online Type 2 Diabetes in America 2014 survey, which gathered insights about their symptoms and treatment experience, as well as their quality of life and disease management.

Type 2 Diabetes tracking by the numbers

Less than 1/2
Of individuals’ most recent A1C levels fell within the American Diabetes Association’s suggested range of 7% or less (47%).1

34%
Of individuals indicated that their A1C levels have been trending down over time and 59% of those who have been trending down have A1C levels of 7% or less. 36% of those surveyed indicated that their A1C levels remained about the same, with 60% of them having an A1C level of 7% or less.

1 in 4
Of those who have their A1C routinely tested cited that their daily activities are not affected by Type 2 Diabetes, whereas only 1 in 8 of those who do not have it tested are able to say the same**.

> 1/2 of those who DO NOT have their A1C tested

Find that Type 2 Diabetes impacts their emotional well-being (58%) and 25% indicate that they feel alone. Whereas 41% of those who do have A1C tested find Type 2 Diabetes impacts their emotional well-being and only 15% feel alone**.
Cite that Type 2 Diabetes has a financial impact on their lives (51%), as compared to the 38% of those who do have it tested**.

40%
Of those who did not test their A1C levels regularly are not enjoying their life as much and 13% are feeling the impact of Type 2 Diabetes on their ability to maintain relationships**.

Conversely, less than 1/3 of those who have their A1C regularly tested (32%) find that they don’t enjoy life as much as they used to and only 6% find that Type 2 Diabetes has impacted their ability to maintain relationships.

Type 2 Diabetes tracking by the numbers

2.3
The average number of Type 2 Diabetes treatments used by those who have their A1C routinely tested, as well as by those who test their blood sugar at home. These individuals use more treatments than their counterparts who don’t have their A1C tested or test their blood sugar on their own (average of 2.0 treatments for both groups)**.

59%
Of those who have their A1C tested by their HCP are satisfied with their current treatment plan, compared to only 33% of those who do not have routine A1C testing (top 2 box satisfaction)**.

4 of 5
Of individuals who experience fluctuations in their A1C are more apt to test at home, regardless of whether their levels are trending up (84%) or trending down (83%). Those whose A1C remains stable are less likely to test at home (75%).

1 in 5

Of those surveyed did NOT test their own blood sugar on a regular basis (at least once a week, 21%). Common barriers to at home testing were forgetfulness (41%), expense (25%) and not liking the needle sticks (22%).
Of those who test their blood sugar at home find that they have it under control but 15% cite they just can’t get it under control. 24% of self-testers indicated that most times their blood sugar is good and sometimes it’s bad. 40% indicated that sometimes it’s good and sometimes it’s bad.

88%
Of those surveyed tested their blood sugar at home at least once a day, with 14% testing at every meal and 25% testing several times a day.

2.0
The average number of Type 2 diabetes treatments used by those who have their blood sugar under control, which is significantly less than those treatments used by their counterparts having issues with getting their blood sugar under control (2.5 by those who can’t get it under control and average of 2.4 by those who experience fluctuations in their ability to control)**.

Only 8%
Of those surveyed used a smartphone app to track their blood sugar over time. Almost all of self-testers use only one specific device, and 75% of them were satisfied with this device (top 2 box satisfaction).

Type 2 Diabetes tracking by the numbers

73%
Of those who test their own blood sugar were actively trying to lose weight, compared to 62% who do not test**.

For people with Type 2 Diabetes, regular A1C testing plays a role in monitoring how well your blood glucose is controlled. These numbers from Type 2 Diabetes In America also indicate that having a healthcare provider regularly test A1C may help you feel more satisfied with your treatment regimen and less emotionally impacted by the management of your condition.

**The differences between the two groups is statistically significant (p < .05)

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