Expert Answers: Getting a Better Night’s Rest

Our health depends on getting an adequate amount of sleep on a daily basis. Lack of sleep aggravates insulin resistance and can cause high blood pressure, abnormal lipids, and obesity, all risk factors associated with diabetes. Sleep can be a key factor in diabetes management. Our experts, Kelly and Meryl, offer tips for getting a better night’s rest:

Response from Kelly

Kelly DabelUnfortunately, poor blood sugar control and lack of sleep often go hand in hand. If blood sugars are high throughout the day, your kidneys will be working overtime trying to flush it out by urinating, which means you’ll be up in the night several times to use the restroom. Likewise, if your blood sugar is too low at bedtime you may have restless sleep, excessive fatigue the next day or other hypoglycemic symptoms. Generally speaking, you want to aim for a blood sugar between 100-140 at bedtime, or per your doctor. A bedtime snack may be needed but keep it light as going to bed with a full stomach can interfere with sound sleep.

If following a consistent diet, increasing your physical activity and taking your prescribed medications doesn’t seem to be working, consider speaking with your Diabetes doctor about adjusting your medications or getting tested for sleep apnea or restless leg syndrome, other conditions that can interfere with a good night’s sleep.

Response from Meryl

Meryl Profile PictureHaving a regular nighttime routine in which you have some time to wind down can help ease you into sleep. Some people find reading or listening to soft music before going to bed helpful.

Another thing that can disrupt a good nights sleep is having blood sugars that are persistently elevated. This will cause you to urinate more making it more challenging to sleep peacefully through the night.

Do you have trouble getting an adequate night’s sleep? Are there any tricks you use? Let us know in the comments!

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